Our Blog

What is a crown?

January 16th, 2019

If you have never had a crown before, you might be wondering why crown treatment is best, what the procedure involves, and which type of crown to choose. Let’s get down to the basics of crowns!

A crown is the best way to treat many dental conditions, either to strengthen and save the tooth or to improve its appearance. We might suggest a crown if you have any of the following conditions:

  • A filling that needs to be replaced, without enough tooth structure left to fill properly
  • A tooth that is fractured or broken, or so weak that it might fracture
  • A recent root canal
  • An implant
  • A bridge which needs a crown to serve as the base for attachment
  • A tooth that is discolored or irregularly shaped

On your first visit to our East Norriton, PA office, Dr. Bentz will prepare the tooth that will be receiving a crown. A tooth might have to be built up if there isn’t enough of the original tooth left, or the top and sides of the tooth will be shaped down so that the crown fits smoothly and evenly with your other teeth. An impression will be made and sent to a dental lab so that a crown with the perfect fit for your tooth and mouth can be created. A temporary crown will be put in place to protect your tooth while the final crown is fabricated.

 The permanent crown is a cap which covers your tooth. It can be made of various materials, which all offer different advantages:

  • Metal Crowns—made of gold, platinum or base metal alloys, these are the longest lasting. Because of their metallic color, they are often chosen for back molars where they are less visible.
  • Porcelain Over Metal—because the color of the porcelain is matched to your natural teeth, these crowns look very realistic. Porcelain is more fragile than metal, so there is the possibility that they won’t be as durable.
  • Resin—less expensive than other options, but these crowns are more fragile and do not wear as well.
  • All Porcelain/All Ceramic—the most realistic looking option, especially for front teeth, and also suitable for anyone with a metal allergy. They are, again, not as strong as metal crowns, and can be subject to damage.
  • Stainless Steel—often used for baby teeth or as a temporary crown for adult teeth.

We’ll discuss your options and help you decide on the best type of crown for you. When the crown is finished at the dental lab, you will have one more visit where the crown will be secured in place. We will make sure your bite is comfortable and the color and appearance of the crown are satisfactory. We will also give you instructions for the next few days following the procedure, and can make adjustments if needed.

A crown is a perfect example of form and function working together: a crown maintains the beauty of your smile and preserves the health of your tooth. If you need a crown, we will be happy to talk to you about your best options for a strong, long-lasting, and natural smile.

What NOT to Eat after Wisdom Teeth Extraction

January 9th, 2019

Now that you’re having your wisdom teeth removed at our East Norriton, PA office, you’re probably looking forward to spending a few days on the couch with a cool dish of ice cream in hand. Good! Give yourself time to heal, and choose foods that will be soothing and safe for your mouth as you recover. We’ll provide you with detailed instructions on how to take care of yourself immediately after your surgery, and that includes suggesting the best menu options.

But while you’re making your post-wisdom teeth shopping list, there are several kinds of foods and beverages that should be crossed right off. If it’s small, spicy, sticky, or steamy, put it back on the shelf. Spirits? Not this round. Drinks with straws? Absolutely not. Items like these can undermine your healing and recovery.

  • Small and Crunchy

Any small particles, such as seeds or grains, or items like cookies, crackers, nuts, and popcorn which turn into small particles, can wind up lodged in the surgical site where your tooth was removed. These particles can also interfere with the blood clot that forms to protect the socket as it heals. If the clot is dislodged, there is a chance that a painful condition called “dry socket” can develop.

  • Spicy

Spicy and acidic foods can irritate delicate gum tissue. It’s best to wait until your gums are back to normal before uncapping the hot sauce.

  • Sticky

Sticky, crunchy, and chewy foods can be hard on the extraction site, so stick to a soft diet until you have healed. Now is the time to try all the pudding flavors!

  • Steamy

Piping hot foods and drinks can interfere with the protective clot—ask us about the best time to resume your morning coffee.

  • Spirits

Mixing pain medication and alcohol can be dangerous. Talk to Dr. Bentz about possible interactions. And some studies have suggested that alcohol use slows healing, so even without pain medication, it could be a good idea to wait until you are healed to toast your beautiful smile.

  • Straws

And last, but by no means least, leave the straws in their little paper wrappers! Any kind of suction brings a real risk of dislodging the protective blood clot that has formed at the surgical site. Milkshakes are delicious, but eat them with a spoon. (And please, no cigarettes!)

Follow our suggestions for a soothing, safe diet, and you will be enjoying your regular menu favorites in no time. So rest, relax, eat sensibly, and enjoy that second bowl of ice cream. Doctor’s orders!

Quit Smoking to Save Your Smile

December 26th, 2018

You have probably counted a hundred reasons to stop smoking. It’s unhealthy. It’s expensive. It annoys the people around you. You have to schedule your day around the next cigarette. But here’s reason number 101: Did you know that one of the many side effects of smoking is the damage it does to your smile?

Your Appearance

One of the most obvious results of smoking is the constant yellowing and discoloration of your teeth. Tobacco stains can take longer to remove with home brushing and whitening. And, while a professional cleaning and whitening will make a world of difference, all that good work is undone once you start smoking again.

More important, no smile looks its best with periodontal disease and tooth loss. Smoking has been linked to the presence of more harmful oral bacteria and higher occurrences of cavities and gingivitis (early gum disease). Periodontitis, or severe gum disease, is much more common among smokers. Tooth loss is also much more likely.

Healing after Dental Surgery

Smoking slows the healing process. It has been linked to a weaker immune system, so it’s harder to fight off an infection or to heal from one.  And because of the harmful effect of smoking on bone tissue, there is a higher failure rate for dental implants among smokers. Bone density can be so compromised that an implant is not even an option.

Healing after Extractions

If you have a tooth extracted, the formation of a blood clot at the site of the removal is essential to avoid a condition called dry socket. Dry socket can lead to pain, serious infection, and other complications. Luckily, this clot is resilient and pretty hard to dislodge—unless you apply suction such as sipping through a straw or drawing smoke from a cigarette.

Oral Cancer

Research has shown that smoking is the single most serious risk factor for oral cancer. The good news is that this risk is cut dramatically if you quit!

Let Dr. Bentz help you maintain your smile. We can offer many more reasons to give up the smoking habit, and we are happy to offer suggestions for quitting during your next visit to our East Norriton, PA office. We want to protect your smile and your health as well. It doesn’t really matter which number on the list finally leads you to quit—every number on that list is your lucky number!

Toothbrush Arts and Crafts

December 19th, 2018

When you replace your old toothbrush every three or four months with a new model, you accomplish three things:

  • You keep your teeth cleaner (frayed brushes don’t clean as well)
  • You protect your gums (you won’t be scrubbing harder to get your teeth clean)
  • You add another toothbrush to your growing collection of used brushes

If creative recycling is one of your talents, you might have already discovered how handy repurposed brushes are for cleaning delicate or hard-to-reach spaces around the house. But those old brushes don’t have to spend their entire existence cleaning! Here are some ideas from Dr. Bentz to give a new, artistic life to your old, uninspired toothbrush.

  • Splatter Painting

As your bathroom mirror can confirm, toothbrushes are great for splattering. Why not put those bristles to creative use by adding color bursts to canvas, wooden picture frames or boxes, fabric, cards, gift wrap and more? Just dip the tips of the bristles into the paint, point them toward your surface, and brush your finger over the head. For more formal effects, splatter paint over your favorite stencils on paper or fabric. Or work your magic by splattering around a stencil for a dramatic silhouette.

  • Children’s Painting

Your child might find it great fun to use an old toothbrush to create new works of art. The easy-to-grip handle and wide bristles are perfect for painting those first masterpieces. Splatter painting is also a wonderful art activity for children—but be prepared for some clean-up!

Texturizing Clay Pieces

Whether you work in potter’s clay, polymer clay, or Play-Doh, an old toothbrush can provide any number of interesting textures to your piece. Press the bristles into the clay for a sophisticated stippled background, or brush long gentle strokes for a striated effect.

  • Carpentry

Wood glue creates strong bonds when you are joining edges, mitering corners, or fitting mortise and tenon joints. It also creates a sticky mess when you use your fingers, a wood or plastic spreader, or one of your good paint brushes. For any gluing jobs or joinery, try a toothbrush for greater control and easy application.

  • Jewelry Making

If you work with jewelry pieces, you know that sometimes there are nooks and crannies that are almost impossible to clean or polish. Try a gentle brush with an old toothbrush and the recommended polish for your piece—but do keep brushes away from the delicate surface of pearls. And for the boldly creative, why not use your toothbrush itself as jewelry? There are online instructions out there for transforming that old brush into a colorful bangle bracelet.

In turns out that there’s a second career waiting for your toothbrush after all! Make sure to clean your toothbrushes thoroughly before using them in another role. After that, let your creativity run wild—including your creative recycling! It’s just another way you are crafting a more beautiful environment for all of us.